Climax

Gaspar Noé's reputation needs scant introduction. The provocateur has seemed to be running out of rope in recent years, his last effort Love critically condescended to alongside the automatic box office failure he's used to. With Climax he has bafflingly resecured some of his cachet, despite a messy and unfocused contrivance of a film. Audiences are introduced to a cast … Continue reading Climax

BlacKkKlansman

If it’s tempting to praise the timeliness of Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman, it’s also worth remembering that America’s issues with institutional and accepted racism never really went away. This sometimes incendiary, but generally tame film could have been released any time in the last thirty years and still summoned the righteous rage with which it closes, … Continue reading BlacKkKlansman

The Meg

Films are often praised for doing what they advertise on their tin - simplicity is no sin in and of itself. When that tin looks like it'll contain a monster film of questionable quality, though, this straightforwardness is still a burden. Cockney wedge Jason Statham is our hero, a wisecracking and nominally harrowed ex-diver named … Continue reading The Meg

Incredibles 2

It can be difficult, on a nostalgic and intuitive level, to criticise Pixar for their attitude to franchises they created and realised with generally breath-taking skill and wit. Yet watching Incredibles 2, despite moments of visual excellence and lacerating irony, one can conclude that they simply don’t know best. This is not a bad film; … Continue reading Incredibles 2

Skyscraper

With a somewhat refreshing simplicity at its core and a generously quick pace, Skyscraper is as big and stupid as its titular building, and similarly just about avoids major disaster. The Rock’s box office pull has seemed undeniable in recent months, propping up the mediocre Jumanji and Rampage. In Skyscraper he is Will Sawyer, retired hostage rescuer and family man. In a … Continue reading Skyscraper