Rampage

Fresh on the tail of Tomb Raider, Rampage arrives to demonstrate that there is no easy route to videogame movie success. Where Alicia Vikander's vehicle attempted to ape the thematic success of its complicated source, Rampage aims to drop Dwayne Johnson into a situation as preposterously stupid as the arcade game it was "inspired" by. Its success is extremely limited. … Continue reading Rampage

A Quiet Place

Silence is a risk factor for the modern mainstream film. Used well, it can be atmospherically transformative, and tension-ratcheting. Given audiences’ current predilections toward chat and crunchy foods, however, the prospect of a film primarily steeped in total quiet, as promised by A Quiet Place, is itself a stress-inducing one. When this assured debut from John … Continue reading A Quiet Place

Isle of Dogs

Wes Anderson, we can credibly speculate based on the title of his latest film, loves dogs. In Isle of Dogs, running with this clear affection for man's best friend, he takes the strengths of his first animated outing, Fantastic Mister Fox, and improves on them all, while telling a charming tale in a dystopic Japan. Megasaki, a fictional … Continue reading Isle of Dogs

The Square

Ruben Östlund’s new satire, The Square, is an epic shot across the bows of the art world, savaging pretension and selfishness. It is almost certainly overlong and over-ambitious, but contains moments of sparkling wit and toe-curling discomfort, and some truly memorable imagery. Claes Bang, whom only Scandi fans will likely recognise, is the achingly cool Christian, curator … Continue reading The Square

Annihilation

Alex Garland is developing a justified reputation as an auteur for our times - he has written well-liked genre films, from 28 Days Later to Dredd, alongside a pair of the more thoughtful narrative games of this decade, DMC and Enslaved: Odyssey to the West. His directorial debut Ex Machina cemented his position as a rising genre star, and his … Continue reading Annihilation

Mute

Netflix's quest for cinematic world domination continues with Duncan Jones's new film, Mute. The director of eerie cult classic Moon and the sprightly Source Code has demonstrated the fallacy of Netflix's model, however, with a frankly dull science fiction thriller. Alexander Skarsgård is the film's central and titular mute, a future-Amish man named Leo who won't have his vocal chords … Continue reading Mute